Livelihoods & Food Security

Eastern Samar was the first province to receive the storm and thus suffered the brunt of the Typhoon’s force. With the destruction of farmlands also came the destruction of peoples’ income sources leaving them with no other option than negative coping mechanisms such as debt, ultimately increasing th...

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Eastern Samar was the first province to receive the storm and thus suffered the brunt of the Typhoon’s force. With the destruction of farmlands also came the destruction of peoples’ income sources leaving them with no other option than negative coping mechanisms such as debt, ultimately increasing their poverty and food insecurity. Among the hardest hit were coconut farmers belonging among the poorest rural people in the Philippines.

In PIN’s target areas, 60-90% of coconut trees – the main source of farmers’ livelihoods – were destroyed, resulting in an up to 70% decrease in households’ incomes. The optimistic outlook is that it will take at least 6-9 years before coconuts return to full production.

The first year after the Typhoon, PIN team focused on rapid livelihood recovery for the most affected and vulnerable households through Cash for Assets and conditional cash grants programmes. However, as the Typhoon exacerbated the pre-Haiyan chronic poverty and brought further misery to an already fragile economy, Eastern Samar currently ranks as the second poorest province in the Philippines and more needs to be done to provide longer-term sustainable household income and ensure that the re-development of economic livelihoods is done in a pro-poor manner. Therefore, to enhance the recovery and resilience building efforts in Eastern Samar, our team continues working with the poor farming households to increase the production, productivity and marketability of their agricultural produce through introduction of market based rural services.

 

Source:  Člověk v tísni

 

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